386 Monmouth Street

The City of Independence Oregon - Official Website
Classification:
Primary
Year Built:
1880
Style:
Queen Anne

The one and one half story residence is asymmetrical in plan and has an intersecting gable roof covered with composition shingle. Weatherboard siding with cornerboards and caps sheaths the exterior. A brick foundation supports the building. The windows are two over two double hung wood sash with a projecting cornice. There is a full height polygonal bay window with turned pilasters on the south elevation. Above this is a gable ornament. The entrance to the house is through a paneled door with a transom light and projecting cornice. The entrance to the house is through a paneled door with a transom light and projecting cornice. The entry porch has wrought iron cresting and a lightning rod. A tower on the southwest corner of the house blew down in 1962 and board and batten siding was added to the rear extension. Two tall brick chimneys with corbelled caps were removed. The residence faces south on the corner of Monmouth Street and South Fourth Street and is in excellent condition.

A contributing two car garage is located north of the residence and is covered with a gable roof. A gable ornament decorates the gable end. The building is clad with shiplap siding.

The residence was built by J.A. Wheeler around 1880. Lucy Ann and John Wheeler were both from New York and first appear in Oregon in the 1880 census. Wheeler was the general manager of the Prescott and Vaness Sawmill in Independence and operated a blacksmith shop on Main Street for many years. Wheeler was very active politically and served on the City Council. The residence remained in the Wheeler family until 1902. Later occupants include Glen and Carolyn Smith. Smith was an employee of the Farmer State Bank on Main Street and was Postmaster of Independence from 1933 to 1957. The building was entered on the National Register of Historical Places in 1986.

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